While my regular podcasting home is the Legal Talk Network (watch for a new episode of the Legal Toolkit later this week, in which I explain my long hiatus and introduce a show co-host), I have been known to dip my toe into other waters, appearing as a guest on other podcasts, from time to time.  And, it seems that I have been appearing as a guest of Solo Practice University founder, Susan Cartier Liebel, quarterly, for the past year.  Boy, that escalated quickly.

With a year’s worth of shows in the hopper, this would likely be a good time to aggregate those titles.  Therefore, you can listen to Susan and I discussing ‘New Solo Attorney FAQs’, ‘Tech for New (and Not So New) Lawyers’, ‘You Know Everything There Is To Know About Social Media . . . Or Do You?’ and ‘The Ethics of Using Social Media as a Client Communications Tool’.

Get your ears on, good buddies (and buddettes).

. . .

Liner Notes

Being that we are talking Solo Practice University, How about some solo performances by artists known for their participation with popular musical groups . . . How about that?  (And, let’s try to make them obscure, where possible/as I am inclined.)

Run of the Mill’ by George Harrison (my favorite Beatle strikes out on his own)

Irreplaceable’ by Beyonce (late of Destiny’s Child)

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning’ by Phil Collins (late of Genesis)

What Goes Around . . . Comes Around’ by Justin Timberlake (late of ‘N Sync — yes, I just wrote that)

Love is Stronger Than Justice (The Munificent Seven)’ by Sting (late of the Police)

Harvest’ by Neil Young (late of Buffalo Springfield)

Walking on Broken Glass’ by Annie Lennox (late of the Eurythmics)

Mud Slide Slim’ by James Taylor (late of the Flying Machine)

Oh Sherrie’ by Steve Perry (late of Journey)

Flirting with Time’ by Tom Petty (late of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers; but, mostly on-time)

Roll With It’ by Steve Winwood (late of the Spencer Davis Group, Traffic and Blind Faith)

I’m Alight’ by Kenny Loggins (late of Loggins and Messina)

Coward of the County’ by Kenny Rogers (late of the First Edition)