Everybody needs a break, sometimes. Perhaps that explains the popularity of those old Kit Kat commercials. (Damn, I could really go for a Kit Kat right now, after watching that! . . . Oh my God! (Subliminal) messaging does work! Break me off a piece.)

After roughly forty-five 2009 blog posts, covering roughly 225,000 words, all I have to say is that: “My typing fingers are tired”.

So, I’ve tried to take a lesson from television sitcoms, and the movies: What are some of the things that you can do to attempt to revive a tiring, flagging franchise?

Well, we could introduce a child blogger, a la Cousin Oliver, of Brady Bunch fame. That’s a tried and true method. But, I figure, if we’re gonna jump the shark, we might as well do it up right. I think . . . We Need a Montage!!

What’s that . . . ? We don’t have the budget for a montage? . . . Um, okay then.

Sharks with laser beams on their heads? No. Sea bass? Are they ill-tempered? Alright then.

Without further ado, then, the Best of the LOMAP Blog, for the calendar year 2009:

In the twelfth month of the year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . a post about the free data privacy all-day conference we’re co-sponsoring on January 27, 2009 in Springfield that you should all come to . . . bring along twelve drummers drumming, if you want . . . as long as they can stay quiet during the presentations, not drumming, ya dig . . .

In the eleventh month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . information and analysis on how to advertise as a new lawyer while not holding yourself out as a specialist . . . eleven pipers are going forth to pipe the news to the legal community . . . (Not in the budget either? Ok.)

In the tenth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . an overview of the SJC’s interim guidelines for the protection of personal identifying data in court documents . . . and ten lordly lawyers leapt out of their tights because they were concerned over what they had to do now; but, I told them that it wasn’t that big a deal, and everything was chill again . . .

In the ninth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . practice management software options . . . nine ladies were hanging out, and dancing, but then they left, because the party got lame . . .

In the eighth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . a guest blog post about the use of lawyer referral services . . . although we had an intern, we never had eight milking maids; in fact, I don’t want to even touch that one: I drink skim . . .

In the seventh month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . Rodney’s take on how podcasts can help your practice . . . you can listen to podcasts on your iPod, while walking around the park, and, that’s right: watching seven swimming swans . . .

In the sixth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . advice on bra-a-a-nding, your law firm . . . like the six geese that laid six golden eggs . . .

In the fifth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . fiiiiiiiiiiive goooooold rings . . . and one post on Google tips and tricks . . .

In the fourth month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . pros and cons of establishing a virtual law office . . . which is a sight better than making four calling birds your receptionists . . .

In the third month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . suggestions for beefing up business cards . . . I can’t think of anything here that has to do with three French hens . . .

In the second month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . Rodney wrote about the importance of finding a mentor . . . you and your mentor, cuddling like two turtle doves, around the warm fire of the law . . .

In the first month of this year, the LOMAP Blog gave to me . . .

. . . a review of the 2008 edition of the ABA’s “The Legal Career Guide: From Law Student to Lawyer” . . . my first post . . .

. . . And a partridge in a pear treeeeeeeeee!!!!!!

(Damn, that’s catchy. I should remember that.)

Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

. . .

Liner Notes

I’ll tell you, though, I never get to bed on time. Especially on Christmas Eve. I love Christmas. I wish every day could be Christmas. Literally. If every day were Christmas I would be happy. I wouldn’t even mind the cold. I love Christmas like Ray Liotta loved Christmas on “Just Shoot Me”, in that creepy-weird sort of way. I listen to Christmas music in the summer.

The fact that my love for Christmas would dovetail with my love for music will not surprise regular readers of the LOMAP blog. And, it should probably not either be a shock that this is my Christmas songs edition of “Liner Notes”. Yup. You’re in it right now. Surprised? Don’t be. That just happened.

There are many singers of many Christmas songs; but, for my money, the best of all-time is Perry Como. The Perrydactyl could lay it down for the season. His bass voice, unfounded these days, in popular music, worked perfectly for the production of Christmas classics. A barbershop singer, though the story is less dramatic than it might otherwise be told, Mr. C became one of the most popular artists and television personalities of his generation. Everything about him was smooth. I mean, just look at his Wikipedia photo: Is that not the most pimped look ever? Is that a woolen gray
button-down shirt? Seriously? One time, they took Perry Como’s car in for “Pimp My Ride”, but they were like, “Sorry, There’s nothing we can do. It’s already taken care of.” Honestly, if Perry Como ever propositioned me, I’d have a tough time saying no.

My favorite Christmas song of all time is Perry Como’s “Home for the Holidays”. Owning a Perry Como Christmas CD is something like owning Christmas. Many of his other songs belong in the Christmas pantheon, as well. “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas”, “Santa Clause Is Coming to Town” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” have all become standards.

As my unrequited love for Perry Como can attest, I am a staunch Christmas traditionalist. I like the old stuff. Perhaps this is because, for the first many years of my life, I only listened to Christmas songs on my grandmother’s massive, ancient, dusty record player, playing her old records. If you, too, love the old Christmas tunes, and you do not yet own the Time-Life Treasury of Christmas, buy it: today. You will not be sorry. It’s a ridiculous value at $10, like you are stealing on old Saint Nick himself.

A very partial list of some of the best of the Christmas standards include:

Jingle Bell Rock” by Bobby Helms

Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” by Brenda Lee

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” by Gene Autry

Hark, the Herald Angels Sing” by Nat “King” Cole

A Holly Jolly Christmas” by Burl Ives

Mele Kalikimaka” by Bing Crosby, featuring The Andrews Sisters

Ah, yes. That makes you feel warm inside, like you just drank a steaming hot toddy.

But, just because I like the old songs doesn’t mean that I’m a hater. How could be, on Christmas!

There are a number of more contemporary Christmas songs that I also enjoy, including:

Step Into Christmas” by Elton John (my wife and I played this song at our June wedding; no kidding)

White Christmas” by The Drifters (why I did not include, above, der Bingle’s classic version)

Fairytale of New York” by The Pogues, featuring Kirsty MacColl

The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late)” by Alvin and the Chipmunks

God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen/We Three Kings” by the Barenaked Ladies, featuring Sarah McLachlan

Circle of Steel” by Gordon Lightfoot

In consideration of my having to save some ammunition for next year’s Christmas songs post, I should stop here, I feel like.

It’s almost time to eat my twenty-fourth chocolate of Advent.